Books on wider parenting topics

Authors in bold are particularly recommended

 

Shefali Tsabary The Conscious Parent: Transforming Ourselves, Empowering Our Children Invites parents to become more mindful of daily interactions and power struggles with their children so that rather than seeing children’s actions as misbehaviour, parents can recognise an opportunity to be kinder and more open. Also understands that parents unwittingly pass on an inheritance of psychological pain and emotional issues, so having children and teenagers in particular, are an opportunity for us to grow.

 

Maggie Stevens The Parent Fix: When Parents Change . . . Kids Change. This book is helpful in becoming better parents by examining our own behaviours first and making changes in order to effectively guide and influence our kids.

 

Jasmin Lee Cori The Emotionally Absent Mother: A Guide to Self-Healing and Getting the Love You Missed. This is a helpful book for those who are parenting and were “under-mothered” themselves as children.  As people we may struggle with intimate relationships, in part because of their unmet need for maternal care and this helps us understand this and improve as parents to our children.

 

Beverly Engel Honour your anger: How transforming your anger style can transform your life. Provides a wide perspective of anger and how to change patterns where we may be damaging others.

 

Thomas Lewis, Fari Aminin, Richard Lannon A general theory of love Fantastic for understanding why and how we form love bonds and how it impacts each of us – adults and children. By understanding this, we are inclined to be more patient, compassionate, and therefore do a better job as a parent.

 

Sue Johnson Love Sense – The Revolutionary New Science of Romantic Relationships A wonderful resource for all kinds of couples. The better the couple bond and parental understanding, the happier and more secure the children are.

 

Lundy Bancroft Why does he do that? Inside the minds of angry and controlling men. Domestic abuse is extremely common in today’s households and has a big effect on children. Often, a person does not realise they are IN an abusive relationship and this book is perhaps the most useful for understanding if someone is in an abusive relationship and what to do about it. If parents are separated, it will also help manage relationships whether male or female, and includes gay couples too. (NB. The author explains the use of the male pronoun).

 

Caroline McGee Childhood experiences of domestic violence This is a professional book but very readable and compassionate. It’s the best introduction to the experiences of children, their emotional reactions, and how to effectively assist children to safety and recovery. There are also other books in this area by Lundy Bancroft and Jay Silverman, and Betsy McAlister Groves which people find validating and helpful.